The Big Three Public School Textbook Publishers

TextbooksThe first book of any girth I ever read was, “The Borrowers”, written by Mary Norton and originally published by J.M. Dent. I don’t know who publishes it now, or even if it’s still in publication.

I remember being in 5th grade and having finished all the “Hi-Light” booklets there were to read, doing all the work that went with them, then the student teacher came down on me like a ton of bricks. I was told to choose a “real” book, read it and do a book report. Not one to back down, even at that age, I accepted the challenge.

Our next Library visit, he monitored me to make sure I picked a “real” book and not one to be intimidated, I picked “The Borrowers”, 700 pages. Then when I got home, I asked my mom to read it for me and give me the short version.

She challenged me to read just one chapter. 5 chapters later, I was hooked. Wherever Mr. Simmons is now, I want to thank him for being so adamant with me at that tender age. I have had the opportunity to read many books of girth since then. The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, The Illiad and the Odyssey, The Upanishads and everything in between. Even Michao Kaku’s Quantum Physics, which I highly recommend by the way.

Did you ever wonder where your children get their information? Once upon a time, when I had elemetary school aged children, I did and this is what I found.

Pearson Publications publishes textbooks for corporations, schools and students. Pearson owns several subsidaries including but not limited to eCollege, MyEnglishLab, Penguin Readers, Addison–Wesley and Financial Times Press.

That last one really caught my attention. It ought to catch your attention too. The Financial Times is a publication dedicated soley to business, economics and finance.

Pearson is part of Pearson PLC and bought Simon & Schuster from Viacom, then merged it with its own education division in 1998 and split it into International and North American divisions.

Nothing like diversification is there. [sic]

McGraw Hill Financial Inc, headquartered in Rockefeller Center in New York City. They’re mainly focused again, on business, economics and finance. Some of their subsidaries include Standard & Poor’s along with, J.D. Power and Associates. They are the majority shareholder of the S&P Dow Jones.
How did these people get a hold of our children’s education?

Houghton Milfin Company was a subsidiary of Education Media and Publishing Group Limited, based in Ireland and registered in the Cayman Islands. Formerly known as Riverdeep. They changed their name in 2010 after buying Harcourt Publishing.

So the corporations publishing our children’s texbooks, are in control of, not only their education but also our finances and at least one of them is based in the Cayman Islands.

Isn’t that where all the rich people hide their ill gotten gains?

With only these three corporations, all dedicated to finance, in control of our children’s education, I have to ask, what kind of Monopoly game are they playing with our future? Our children are our future, educational textbooks and lesson plans, pale in comparison to way my generation were taught.
Our children are supposed to be better educated and have better lives than we did. So when did that change?

Every parent ought to be asking that last question.

Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence?

Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before they died.

Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.

Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured.

Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the Revolutionary War.

They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor. What kind of men were they?

Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were merchants, nine were farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated, but they signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured.

Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties to pay his debts, and died in rags.

Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move his family almost constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and his family was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and poverty was his reward.

Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer, Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.

At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.

Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed. The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.

John Hart was driven from his wife’s bedside as she was dying. Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his children vanished.

Courtesy of Sunday Pat